Posts Tagged ‘Twitter’

It’s OK to Be a Follower - 3 Simple Steps

Thursday, Apr 30 2009

A large part of my role is to council our clients and internal management on the use of the latest digital trends and technologies.  Lately, that seems to be Social Media more than everything else combined.

While I believe wholeheartedly in Social Media as a viable communications vehicle that almost all brands should find a place for, I also recognize that social media content creation isn’t for everyone….AND THAT’S OK!

I tell everyone who is leery about the time commitment of content creation that they can participate in social media without taking on that role — and feel good about it!  Afterall, listening is the first tenant of a good social media strategy anyway…and we can all be good listeners.

Here are 3 simple steps to begin to be an effective listener.  Do these and you will be well on your way to becoming a participant in social media — even if you never make another post.

1) Set up Tweet Deck and organize by the following areas: Your clients, Your industry, Your company, Thought Leaders, Your industry pubs…and then for fun, your favorite Entertainers and Celebrities

2) Spend 10 minutes every morning, 5 minutes at lunch, and 10 minutes a the end of the day scanning these posts — in 30 minutes a day you will be amazed how much you have absorbed about your business from all angles

3) Establish an iGoogle account and take the time to set up every industry RSS feed that you can think of.  Add more as you have time.  Scan them quickly each day.

From there, you may become comfortable starting to comment on these links, posts and tweets which is great.  But if not, It’s ok to be a follower.

Brunner Creative Team Live Blogging from South By SouthWest

Thursday, Mar 12 2009

Brunner is sending seven of its top creatives to the South By Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin next week and will be live-blogging throughout the conference.The team—which represents a range of creative disciplines–will be tweeting, posting photos, uploading videos and discussing how the digital revolution is impacts creativity in all forms of media.

“This is the most important New Media event of 2009,” said Creative Director, Emerging Media, Ernie Mosteller. “We hope you’ll find the conversations interesting and informative — but more than that, we hope you’ll join in.”

You can follow the conversation at http://www.smarterfaster.com/ beginning March 13th and for the entire conference which runs through March 17th.

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Social Media Ubiquity: First How, Then What

Monday, Mar 9 2009

We stumbled across this site today – it’s a fantastic resource, but aside from that, we would recommend that you take a quick look (use the purple tab at the bottom to quickly scroll). It illustrates the vast social media world, the rapid pace that it’s evolving, and the sheer enormity of it all.

Every day, we continue to hear these questions from the market:

“We need to be on YouTube!”

“Where’s our Facebook icon?”

Why aren’t we on Twitter?”

We agree that smart digital design should have share-ability baked into its fabric. But we continue to advise: it’s not what tool to use, it’s how you use the tool.

First How. Then What.

Paul Boutin, Blogging and a Puerile Understanding of Mass Communications

Wednesday, Nov 12 2008

In Issue 16.11 of Wired Magazine, Paul Boutin, a correspondent for the Silicon Valley gossip site Valleywag, wrote an essay advising his readers to give up on blogging.  He writes:

Writing a weblog today isn’t the bright idea it was four years ago. The blogosphere, once a freshwater oasis of folksy self-expression and clever thought, has been flooded by a tsunami of paid bilge. Cut-rate journalists and underground marketing campaigns now drown out the authentic voices of amateur wordsmiths. It’s almost impossible to get noticed, except by hecklers. And why bother? The time it takes to craft sharp, witty blog prose is better spent expressing yourself on Flickr, Facebook, or Twitter.

Paul concludes:

As a writer, though, I’m onto the system’s real appeal: brevity. Bloggers today are expected to write clever, insightful, witty prose to compete with Huffington and The New York Times. Twitter’s character limit puts everyone back on equal footing. It lets amateurs quit agonizing over their writing and cut to the chase. @WiredReader: Kill yr blog. 2004 over. Google won’t find you. Too much cruft from HuffPo, NYT. Commenters are tards. C u on Facebook?

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