Posts Tagged ‘social network’

digiday social: A Microcosm of Itself

Wednesday, Mar 18 2009

I attended digiday last week in New York (great stuff, more to come) but the thing that struck me the most was that a real, live social network played itself out in front of me. The dictionary defines network as: an association of individuals having a common interest, formed to provide mutual assistance, helpful information, or the like:- I think everyone gets that - but here’s the thing - digiday was a social network about social networking. Now before the universe implodes or you say ’so what?’ - what really struck me was the diversity of the people who shared this passion. I guess I sort of new it - but it was eye-opening to watch it in person. We had three-pieces suits sitting next to jeans and t-shirts. People sitting on panels having great, involved discussions who were from major motor companies and large agencies to start up developer shops and those only thinking about how to track social media. Large “traditional” publishers (though not many) next to one-man publishing machines. It crystallized for me how the Internet has allowed the introverts to be extroverted and the extroverted to go crazy. People brought together by a passion (in this case it was the “idea” of social media) but could not be from more diverse backgrounds. That’s why you find a 20-post thread about coldsores on catlovers.com and why the guy in front of me at the lunch buffet who looked liked my college roommate in sweats and Chuck Taylor’s was hugging the young woman who looked like she just stepped out of Project Runway and were extolling the virtues of Twitter and who they were following. The thing about social media (and this conference brought it to life) is that it’s the passions and interest of people that bring them together - bond them. Not everyone looked the same at digiday - and not everyone looks the same on catlovers.com - I think we sometimes forget that.

It’s a Webkinz World

Friday, Feb 29 2008

I was a little under the weather this past week and so I spent more time than usual in the Webkinz World with my six year old. A fascinating place. I was interested in the marketing model, the convergence of the on line and offline world, the user experience and the depth of things to do on the site. He was interested in the $800 football bed for his frog “Greenie.” In amongst the thoughts of how they came up with what games to push, who developed them and how they were tested, I found myself asking - “why didn’t I think of this” (along with most every other parent who has visited this place). He was wondering why he could only buy one type of truck for Greenie and thinking he would like a fourth to add to his collection. MORE

It’s a Webkinz World

Friday, Feb 29 2008

I was a little under the weather this past week and so I spent more time than usual in the Webkinz World with my six year old. A fascinating place. I was interested in the marketing model, the convergence of the on line and offline world, the user experience and the depth of things to do on the site. He was interested in the $800 football bed for his frog “Greenie.” In amongst the thoughts of how they came up with what games to push, who developed them and how they were tested, I found myself asking - “why didn’t I think of this” (along with most every other parent who has visited this place). He was wondering why he could only buy one type of truck for Greenie and thinking he would like a fourth to add to his collection. MORE

Social Network Data: How Far is Too Far?

Monday, Jan 28 2008

One of the most thought provoking articles that I’ve come across in a while appeared in the January 21, 2008 issue of AdAge Magazine (http://adage.com/abstract.php?article_id=123200). Essentially the article talks about two very different worlds that are rapidly converging within the social network space.

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Social Networks: Everyone Has To Be There, Now!

Saturday, Aug 18 2007

In the many client meetings I attend each week, I often hear the phrase “we need to get on YouTube” or “we need a MySpace page”. Getting a brand into these popular online properties is often seen as akin to getting past the velvet rope that separates the popular kids from the rest of the world. But uploading brand content to these and other social networks needs as much of a strategy and objective behind it as any other marketing initiative.

Knowing the target audience is crucial in determining if these networks are right for your brand—does your product appeal to that younger, more internet-agile consumer? How often do they watch video online? Do you know what they do when they go online? Taking a strong look (ie. research) at how your consumer behaves within this medium is just as important as understanding how and why they read Women’s Day or watch Desperate Housewives.

Because most of the social networks require constant supervision and updating (more so than many websites or microsites that a brand would launch), having plans, and funds, in place for ongoing content development often resembles the plot points of a television or movie script. Telling a story, creating character, working with the variable ebb and flow of entertaining commentary can make or break your presence—the more you plan and create, the better you will be.